Super low tide discoveries


A couple of sunny days with clear skies have coincided with the full moon making for clear, bright, moonlit nights. Here at Coleshed however, a full moon means something more exciting….. and a quick check of the tide tables reveals it: an extremely low low-tide.

Following some serious juggling of this week’s schedule a clear window was created to get to the beach just ahead of low tide: at 13.49 precisely.

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Rocks revealed. Goodrington.

Goodrington is a good place to find a whole range flora and fauna. There are always lots of large, but worn, cockle shells. We were on the look out for shells with spines intact. Piddocks are another favourite, and only ever found on rocks right down the lower shore.

Time is always pressing…. and the tide waits for no man… (as Canute himself found!). Here is a selection of today’s more photogenic finds, with notes attached:

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(Living) Painted Top Shell (Calliostoma zizyphinum (Linnaeus)) and glorious selection of seaweeds. Nice to see an example intact, as often found worn and empty.

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Hurrah! A fairly intact rough cockle (Acanthocardia tuberculata (Linnaeus)) with blunt spines visible

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Young spider crab in the sand – there were lots of these – newly hatched?

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Great scallop (Pecten maximus (Linnaeus)) – closed but very much alive

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Patience rewarded. The scallop opened to fleetingly reveal the animal inside, before snapping shut.

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Clean washed test (exoskeleton) of sea potato (Echinocardium cordatum). Intact but very fragile. Not nearly as chewy as a tennis ball, as El Doggio now knows!

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Rayed trough shell (Mactra stultorum (Linnaeus)). Shining and slightly translucent in the afternoon sunshine.

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Blackened sea potato (not ever seen a stained one before) with some of the fine spines still in place.

All in all, an hour very well spent!

Next super spring tide already on the calendar.

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4 thoughts on “Super low tide discoveries

  1. Great pictures of lovely finds. The crab is a Masked Crab (Corystes cassivelaunus) – they are small with a carapace in a large adult female usually not exceeding 40mm by 30mm.

  2. Thank you so much for the identification! Is was a bit of a rookie error assuming the crab was something else – I should have looked it up in the first place :)

  3. What beautiful finds, and excellent photos. The top shell photo is my favorite, with that collection of interesting seaweed beneath such a pretty shell. I also love beach-combing at low tide.

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